Home
Bananas in a Balanced Diet Print
 
Rich in potassium, filling and conveniently wrapped, bananas are an ideal snack. Since they are mostly still unripe when sold, store them at room temperature to ripen. Unripe bananas contain starch which the small intestine cannot digest. This causes wind. Most of the starch is converted into sugar during ripening, making ripe bananas sweeter and easier to digest.

They are a popular solid food for babies because they are easily digested and rarely cause allergic reactions. They are also good for treating children’s upset stomachs.

Although research on the link between bananas and stomach ulcers are not conclusive, sufferers report that bananas have a soothing effect.

Potassium, found in bananas, is vital for muscle and nerve function and helps regulate blood pressure.

Bananas release their high levels of sugar slowly into the bloodstream. This sustained supply of energy is why many athletes consume bananas before their exercise. A banana with breakfast will start your day off right and will give you the energy to make it through to lunch without snacking.

One banana provides about 15% of the daily recommended amount of Vitamin C, which boosts the immune system.

One banana supplies 35% of your daily B-6 requirement. The body uses vitamin B-6 to grow new cells.

Bananas also deliver small amounts of other vitamins and minerals. A banana provides some iron, magnesium, calcium and phosphorus as well as vitamins A and E, folate, carotene and choline. Bananas also contain trace amounts of many amino acids.

Interesting Etymological Facts
“Banana” is derived via Portuguese via a Congolese language from the Arabic word, بنان banān (finger tip), a word used in the Qurān (al-Qiyāmah:4).

 موز Mawz is the common Arabic word for banana.

Commentators, such as Mujāhid, state that Talḥ of Paradise mentioned al-Wāqi’ah (verse 29) refers to bananas according to the Yemeni dialect. Others differ on this interpretation.
 
< Prev   Next >

  helpline@sanha.org.za

SANHA Mailing List

 SANHA Mailing List Subscribe

Facebook
      Twitter
   
 
This website is powered by NET31